Tinkering with the Female Body Creates Havoc

July 14, 2015 09:00 AM

There are so many clinical and chemical ways for females to avoid bearing a child while enjoying sexual relations that it is mind-boggling! One has to wonder how, as a human race, we arrived at a point where the technology that can both veto motherhood and endanger a female’s medical and spiritual health is demanded.

The latest example of this is a type of mechanical sterilization called Essure—and it is a product that does anything but assure continued health.

Essure, defined as a form of “permanent birth control,” is presently under public scrutiny, for it is no stranger to controversy. This female sterilization consists of small flexible coils that are inserted into the female’s fallopian tubes. The purpose of the coils is to stop the female egg from travelling in the fallopian tube, thus rendering the egg incapable of joining with sperm to create a unique human being. 

On the federal government’s Food and Drug Administration website, we are told: “Over a period of about three months, tissue forms around the inserts. The build-up of tissue creates a barrier that keeps sperm from reaching the eggs, thus preventing conception. Essure is considered a permanent form of birth control and therefore is not intended to be removed.”

Among the groups covering the unfolding saga relating to this latest sterilization agent, Live Action News reports

National Catholic Register reported late last month that the FDA, after receiving thousands of complaints about the product, has updated a list of risks and complications, and will hold a public hearing on September 24. NC Register also mentioned that Essure has caused the deaths of at least five women and five preborn children.

While the statements from such groups against Essure have seen the FDA’s move as “taking some steps in the right direction,” they are still determined to take Essure off of the market. This is understandable considering the kind of pain many of them have experienced.

And the story gets worse. WXYZ in Detroit reports that “thousands of women across the country are speaking out about their experiences with a form of permanent birth control called Essure. Many of the women who came forward to the 7 Action News Investigators say it was one of the worst decisions they’ve ever made and they want Essure taken off the market.” In addition, “the FDA also admitted that it has received 5,093 complaints about Essure—4150 in the last year-and-a-half alone. A Facebook page, ‘Essure Problems,’ has grown to 18,000 members, many of whom say they have been physically harmed by the device.”

In other words, there is no good health reason to inquire about this or any form of female sterilization in the first place. But on a moral level, the larger question looms: Why would any female intend to make herself sterile? The answer to that question is both complex and simple. She does not want to risk getting pregnant, yet she does want to experience pleasurable sexual relations with a male partner.

This is the real wretchedness of the situation. Women will do anything to their bodies if the action they take provides a perceived avenue to having “safe sex.”

But the emotional and spiritual price that is paid by the female who opts to artificially change the way nature designed her body is perhaps known only to that woman once she realizes the error of her ways.

This is why it is urgent that we never fail to tell the truth with facts, with examples, and most of all with our commitment to respecting every human being—both born and preborn. The naysayers may suggest we are out of touch with modern attitudes, but the proof of their error resides in the truth—truth that such propagandists will avoid at any price, including the price of a human being’s life.

Tinkering with the human body does create havoc. The antidote creates peace.

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