Light and dark--what a difference a few inches makes!

March 17, 2011 09:00 AM

By Kurt Kondrich

[In January] the world was shocked to hear about the "House of Horrors" discovered at a Philadelphia abortion clinic, where a former doctor [was] accused of murdering one patient and seven infants.

The article in my local newspaper stated, "The gruesome details have come from darkness into light for the now-closed abortion clinic in Philadelphia." (emphasis added) "The killing of living babies by cutting their spinal cords with scissors, the use of unsanitary equipment to perform very late-term abortions, the presence of undertrained or untrained staff, the callous behavior, the squalor, the refusals and failures to uphold basic public health standards—this terrible story unfolded for years before finally coming to light." (emphasis added) As I read this, I immediately began thinking what a difference a few inches makes when it comes to how our lost culture classifies a brutal murder and an accepted practice.

When a live human infant is moving from the darkness of the womb and birth canal to enter the light of this world, it is OK to eliminate him or her using a method that would shock anyone. When that infant has entered into the light of the world and is just inches out of the darkness, it is viewed as a horrific, brutal act to terminate the child, when only inches and seconds earlier it was an accepted procedure. The Bible speaks frequently of the issue of light and darkness, and God's Word says people love darkness. John 3:19, for instance, states, "This is the verdict: Light has come into the world, but people loved darkness instead of light because their deeds were evil." (emphasis added) What came to light at the Philadelphia abortion clinic was pure evil, and I can't think of a deed more evil than hurting a completely helpless, defenseless infant. I wonder why there is no outcry when this is done in the darkness.

In the city I live in, there is a group of people who stand in the light at busy intersections and display large photos which show the dark aftermath of abortionthe facts. I have heard people scream at them with disgust and disdain for showing these "horror scenes." Truth is a very difficult thing for people to view when they live in darkness, and this is one main reason Jesus and His Word make so many people uncomfortable, because He is the "Truth." John 14:6: "Jesus answered, I am the way and the truth and the life." Most people have chosen the path of destruction and darkness. Matthew 7:13 says, "Wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it."

I have a beautiful 7-year-old daughter, Chloe, who has Down syndrome, and I am trying to shine light on the dark fact that [more than] 90 percent of children diagnosed prenatally with Down syndrome are targeted and terminated before they leave the darkness of the womb to shine their very bright light into a misguided world. I recently wrote that the devil uses this darkness to prevent an incorruptible light from entering the world. Let us pray that this horrific incident in Philadelphia will place light on the dark realities of abortion, and hopefully one day we will embrace and cherish our most priceless, precious gift—human life!

Kurt Kondrich is the father of a beautiful daughter who has Down syndrome and who has been a priceless blessing to his family and community. When Kurt became aware of the higher than 90 percent abortion rate for children prenatally diagnosed with Down syndrome, he literally could not sleep at night. In early August 2008, he had a disturbing dream about people with disabilities being exterminated and, after praying, he came up with the name SADSIN (Stop Aborting Down Syndrome Individuals Now) for a web site to defend and protect children with Down syndrome. He has since embarked on a mission to make sure people are aware of this genocide. He wants people to see the beautiful faces of our kids and realize the priceless blessings and gifts they are to a society that has lost focus.

This article has been reprinted with permission of the author and can be found at

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